Manchester by the Sea (directed by Kenneth Lonergan)

In this heart-gripping drama, Casey Affleck portrays a man, Lee Chandler, who came backImage result for manchester by the sea to his hometown to deal with the passing of his brother. Lee found out that his brother’s will is for him to be his nephew’s guardian. While trying to build a relationship with his teenage nephew, Lee found himself caught in the past that he does not want to remember. Manchester by the Sea is sorrowful and devastating, however, the sadness and nuances in this film are so real that it made me feel very much alive. The story did not try to force a “perfect” ending. Instead, it let the narrative flow, let the events unfold, and paused at a natural place.

I have never really noticed Casey Affleck in any other film, but his performance in Manchester by the Sea is truly memorable. His Golden Globe for the role of Lee Chandler is well-deserved (despite of what he might have done in real life).

A Monster Calls

A Monster Calls

Sometimes, monsters are not always as they seem. Not all monsters are vicious, gruesome beasts set on scaring you, or eating you, or causing you harm. Some monsters are far worse. Monsters that make you face the reality of your situation. Monsters that make you see the truth for what it is. Monsters that make you accept the inevitable, even though it hurts. Sometimes, these monsters, the monsters within, are the scariest ones of all.

A Monster Calls is beautiful and raw, a gripping tale that will hit you where it hurts. It is a story about personal truths, acceptance and heartbreaking loss. It is a story that will make you question why you’re reading it in the first place. It is a story that will make you question why you didn’t read it sooner. It is a story that pulls at your heart. It is a story worth reading.

Venomous by Christie Wilcox

How Earth's Deadliest Creatures Mastered BiochemistryIt’s amazing what tiny little creatures such as the blue-ringed octopus or a little caterpillar in the rainforest can do to you (paralyze you completely and induce hemorrhaging, respectively), without even your realization that you’ve been bitten or pricked! Where Wilcox really shines in Venomous, though, is when she goes beyond show-and-tell and explains what goes on when you graze the back of that caterpillar with its bristly spine: contrary to what might be expected, this little caterpillar actually causes all the coagulants in your blood to become otherwise engaged so that they’re nowhere to be found while the rest of your blood is running rampant. Hence the hemorrhaging.

Venomous is engaging and serves as a great introduction into the world of venom and the creatures that produce them. Wilcox takes you through a variety of different types of venom, organized more or less by chapter, telling you what they do to their (unfortunate/maybe-brought-it-upon-themselves) victims, connecting their incredible abilities to theories as to why certain creatures should have developed the venoms that they did. In fact, Wilcox goes further and delves – relatively lightly, nothing to be afraid of even if you’re not scientifically minded – into the science of what different venoms do. What you get, in effect, is something along the lines of this: what creature generates what sort of venom, which does what to which animal by targeting which areas, likely influenced by which evolutionary pressures. Wilcox breaks it down so that you understand what’s going on – which neurotransmitters are involved? what areas of the body does it affect and why? why might these creatures have evolved as they did? – as you make your way through the rest of the book, keeping all the information intact by making connections throughout.

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